A-Z Endangered Species Haikus – D, E & F

Continuing this series of haikus to introduce you to some lesser known endangered species. I am trying to present a variety of animals from different nations. Today I have a mammal from West and Central Africa, a bird from North Africa to India, and an amphibian from SE USA.

Drill- Click on Image for more facts

DRILL pink-bummed baboon!

Grooming, chattering in groups.

Forest fun no more.

In the wild only a single population is known in the Korup Reserve in Cameroon. Fauna and Flora International (FFI) are involved in the Drill Rehabilitation and Breeding Center in Nigeria. It aims to rehabilitate orphaned drill and raise awareness of the plight of this species locally. Large groups of noisy drills are an easy target for hunters, especially in cleared forests.

Egyptian Vulture

EGYPTIAN VULTURE

Pharaoh’s chicken scavenger.

Egg-eating experts!

Illegal hunting of the Egyptian Vulture and direct persecution still occur. In Spain, France Greece and Turkey farmers who believe wrongly that it carries disease, poison the vulture! It is the first bird ever to be protected by law. One enamored Pharoah established the death penalty for anyone harming this bird, which he saw as one of nature’s cleaners!

Local groups, such as Projecto Life in Spain,  are working on protecting and promoting this species.

 

Florida Bog Frog

FLORIDA BOG FROG.

In shallow streams he survives,

under Cedar trees.

The Florida bog frog is a rare species (they weren’t discovered until 1982) and special care needs to be taken in order to ensure their continued survival. They will make their homes in or near shallow, non-stagnant streams, which have somewhat acidic water. They do face some threat to their habitat as the residential areas where they live convert streams into chains of lakes. Hopefully, the Florida bog frog will overcome its obstacles and continue its peaceful coexistence with humans. Such a unique amphibian deserves to live and prosper far into the future.

Click for Florida Bog Frog Call Audio, to listen to his mating call, a kind of chuckle!

I am also very lucky to be guest posting today on Susanna Leonard Hill’s vibrant kid lit blog: Joanna Marple demystifies the uTales Process

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14 Responses to A-Z Endangered Species Haikus – D, E & F

  1. What a great way to teach us about endangered species. Thank you, Joanna!

  2. Joanna says:

    Thank you, Beth. I am learning much myself as I research.

  3. Enjoyed your selection of species today. Interesting that they only discovered the Bog Frog in 1982. Listened to the mating call — it was rather funny. Love to learn about species in danger of extinction.

    • Joanna says:

      I liked the bog frog’s chuckle, too, Pat!

      We are discovering new species all the time. Amazing isn’t it?

  4. Joanna, your book is absolutely beautiful! One of my favorites and I mean that with all my heart. I just had to tell you that! And this endangered species series of Haikus is a lotta fun. I am going to show them to Ivy. She wants me to tell you not to forget the tiger. All species of tigers are endangered. 🙂

  5. Joanna says:

    Robyn, you are so kind. Many thanks!

    Tell Ivy, too right!! Will just have to decide which tiger to highlight!

  6. Krista says:

    Im very fond of the Florida Bog Frog. Beautiful post, Joanna.

  7. Joanna says:

    The Florida Bog Frog is local to you, no, Krista?

  8. Love these Joanna! I assume you will be putting all these great haikus together with the little informational blurbs together into an awesome book for kids! 🙂

  9. Joanna says:

    It has crossed my mind. 😉 With a lot of revision, of course!

  10. Hannah Holt says:

    Clap, clap, clap! More please. 🙂

  11. Laurie says:

    I love it! I’m going to share these with my boys.

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